Neurological Considerations for Dyslexia

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Neurological Considerations for Dyslexia

Neuroimaging research suggests that individuals with dyslexia – compared to individuals without – may have fundamental differences in brain regions linked with reading and language. These differences are primarily, although not completely, noted in the left hemisphere of the brain.

The left hemisphere of the brain is associated with many language related skills. Within the left hemisphere of the brain, the temporo-parietal regions have been shown to support the integration of phonology and orthographical patterns. The occipito-temporal region, also often called the visual-word-form area, supports the rapid identifications of letters and words. Activation patterns in the inferior frontal regions have also been linked with language related skills.

Studies report fundamental differences in brain development and activation patterns between individuals with dyslexia and those without.

Suggested Citation

National Center on Improving Literacy (2019). Neurological considerations for dyslexia. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Office of Special Education Programs, National Center on Improving Literacy. Retrieved from http://improvingliteracy.org.

References

Petscher, Y., Fien, H., Stanley, C., Gearin, B., Gaab, N., Fletcher, J.M., & Johnson, E. (2019). Screening for Dyslexia. Retrieved from improvingliteracy.org.

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Topic: Dyslexia