Advocating for My Child’s Literacy Needs

A literacy advocate supports or speaks out for someone else’s educational needs or rights in reading, writing, and language. As a family member, you know your child best. You have seen your child’s literacy skills progress over time.

Audience: 
Parents & Families
Topic: 
Advocacy
Behavioral Considerations in Universal Screening

Screening assessments can help capture each child’s reading and language strengths and weaknesses in key early stages of development.

Audience: 
Schools & Districts
Topic: 
Screening
Best Practices in Universal Screening

There is broad agreement that schools should implement early screening and intervention programs. State legislation generally favors the use of universal screening within schools across grades K-2.

Audience: 
Schools & Districts
Topic: 
Screening

Dyslexia is a brain-based learning disability that specifically impairs a person’s ability to read. For individuals with dyslexia, specific portions of the brain typically associated with important reading processes may not function in the same ways that they do in individuals without dyslexia.

Audience: 
Schools & Districts
Topic: 
Dyslexia
Four Questions to Ask After Universal Screening

Screening for dyslexia risk should be part of a decision-making framework that answers four fundamental questions.

Audience: 
Schools & Districts
Topic: 
Screening
How We Learn to Read: The Critical Role of Phonological Awareness

Phonological awareness involves being able to recognize and manipulate the sounds within words. This skill is a foundation for understanding the alphabetic principle and reading success.

Audience: 
Schools & Districts
Topic: 
Beginning Reading
Key Roles for Children’s Literacy Success

Families and educators can work together to ensure children have successful literacy experiences in and out of school. This is especially important if children have reading difficulties.

Audience: 
Parents & Families
Topic: 
Advocacy, Partnerships
Learning About Your Child’s Reading Development

Learning to read is difficult and does not happen naturally. It requires explicit and systematic instruction, which is especially important for struggling readers. Learning to read involves many different skills that must be taught to your child.

Audience: 
Parents & Families
Topic: 
Beginning Reading
Learning to Read: “The Simple View of Reading”

Learning to read consists of developing skills in two areas: accurate, fluent reading and comprehending the meaning of texts. Learning these skills does not come naturally. Both accurate word reading and text comprehension require careful, systematic instruction.

Audience: 
Schools & Districts
Topic: 
Beginning Reading

Studies report fundamental differences in brain development and activation patterns between individuals with dyslexia and those without.

Audience: 
Schools & Districts
Topic: 
Dyslexia
Partnering With Your Child’s School

You and the school share responsibility for your child’s language and literacy learning. Collaborate with your school to make decisions about your child’s literacy education right from the start. Your child benefits when you and the school work together to support her literacy development.

Audience: 
Parents & Families
Topic: 
Partnerships

Four tips to use when reading with your child.

Audience: 
Parents & Families
Topic: 
Beginning Reading

Questions to ask about your child's reading instruction at school.

Audience: 
Parents & Families
Topic: 
Beginning Reading

Questions to ask about your child's assessments and instruction at school.

Audience: 
Parents & Families
Topic: 
Beginning Reading

Helping your child with speech sounds supports early reading success.

Audience: 
Parents & Families
Topic: 
Beginning Reading

Asking questions can help your child understand what she reads.

Audience: 
Parents & Families
Topic: 
Beginning Reading

Helping your child stretch apart and connect sounds to sound out words supports early reading success.

Audience: 
Parents & Families
Topic: 
Beginning Reading
Route to Reading: Map It Out

Questions to ask about your child's reading skills.

Audience: 
Parents & Families
Topic: 
Beginning Reading
Route to Reading: Repair as Needed

Difficulties can be spotted early, ask these questions if you have concerns about your child's progress at school.

Audience: 
Parents & Families
Topic: 
Beginning Reading

Help your child practice early literacy skills and understand ideas during everyday life.

Audience: 
Parents & Families
Topic: 
Beginning Reading
Route to Reading: Tune-up in the Community

Help your child practice speech sounds and letters during everyday life.

Audience: 
Parents & Families
Topic: 
Beginning Reading

Help your child practice language skills and understand ideas during everyday life.

Audience: 
Parents & Families
Topic: 
Beginning Reading
State Policy and Dyslexia

The characteristics of dyslexia legislation.

Audience: 
Schools & Districts
Topic: 
Dyslexia, Legislation
Succeeding in School: Essential Features of Literacy Development

Reading skills provide the foundation for academic success. From the beginning of school, students should be taught different ways of using language to help them learn and communicate about academic content.

Audience: 
Schools & Districts
Topic: 
Beginning Reading, Vocabulary
Supporting Your Child’s Literacy Development at Home

Taking part in literacy experiences at home can develop your child’s reading ability, comprehension, and language skills.  Activities that you can engage in at home include: joint reading, drawing, singing, storytelling, reciting, game playing, and rhyming.  You can tailor activities to your chil

Audience: 
Parents & Families
Topic: 
Beginning Reading, Comprehension
The Alphabetic Principle: From Phonological Awareness to Reading Words Inforgraphic

The alphabetic principle is a critical skill that involves connecting letters with their sounds to read and write. Learning and applying the alphabetic principle takes time and is difficult for most children.

Audience: 
Schools & Districts
Topic: 
Beginning Reading
Understanding Dyslexia: Myth vs. Facts

Breaking down the truth about Dyslexia.

Audience: 
Parents & Families, Schools & Districts
Topic: 
Dyslexia
Understanding Dyslexia:What are the Effects of Dyslexia

Signs of typical reading development and possible indicators of risk for dyslexia.

Audience: 
Parents & Families, Schools & Districts
Topic: 
Dyslexia
Understanding Screening: Bias

When evaluating the quality of any screening tool, it is important to determine whether or not the assessment is biased against different groups of students.

Audience: 
Schools & Districts
Topic: 
Screening
Understanding Screening: Classification Accuracy

Classification accuracy is a key characteristic of screening tools. A goal in classification accuracy is to correctly identify issues that result in a later problem and situations in which the scores identify issues that do not result in a later problem.

Audience: 
Schools & Districts
Topic: 
Screening
Understanding Screening: Overall Screening and Assessment

Assessment is a process of collecting information. Screening is an assessment process that helps teachers identify students who are at risk for not meeting grade-level learning goals.

Audience: 
Parents & Families, Schools & Districts
Topic: 
Screening
Understanding Screening: Reliability

Reliability is the consistency of a set of scores that are designed to measure the same thing. Reliability is a statistical property of scores that must be demonstrated rather than assumed.

Audience: 
Schools & Districts
Topic: 
Screening
Understanding Screening: Sample Representativeness

Sample representativeness is an important piece to consider when evaluating the quality of a screening assessment.

Audience: 
Schools & Districts
Topic: 
Screening
Understanding Screening: Validity

Validity is broadly defined as how well something measures what it’s supposed to measure. The reliability and validity of scores from assessments are two concepts that are closely knit together and feed into each other.

Audience: 
Schools & Districts
Topic: 
Screening
What Do We Mean by Evidence-based? Infographic

The term evidence-based is defined by the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), as amended by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

Audience: 
Schools & Districts
Topic: 
Evidence-based